Land animals are those animals that live mostly on land, such as dogs, lions, lizards, etc. Their physiognomy is adapted to terrestrial life and according to their biome they can crawl, jump, walk, etc.

Characteristics of land animals

Although they are all very different animals, since they do not share species, size or class, they all share that they live on land for most of their lives and share lung respiration. They also need oxygen and water in order to survive.

All land animals have a good sense of orientation and their diet is as varied as the species that inhabit the earth. Their most developed senses are smell and sight.

Classification

Terrestrial animals can be divided according to their taxonomy, for example, depending on where they live, having three main groups, saxícola animals (they are those that live in rocks), arenícolas (In the sand) and finally troglobites (that inhabit caves ).

We can also make a taxonomic group according to whether they are vertebrate or invertebrate animals, for more information visit their respective categories. Depending on their diet, since they can be carnivores, herbivores or omnivores depending on their diet, for more information visit their categories.

We can group them depending on how they move and what parts of their limbs they can use, we have bipeds, which are animals that move on two legs, their backs and we have quadrupeds, which are the most common, they move with their four extremities.

The brown bear as a land animal
The brown bear as a land animal

The most specific way to group them is according to their edge, a term that refers to according to their physiognomy, we currently have 10 different types of edge.

The first four types of edges refer to worms, mainly. We have in the first place the flatworms or flatworms, there are about 20000 species of flatworms. Then we have the nemerteans, corresponding to small worms. Annelids are ringed worms that live in humid areas. And finally there are the Nematodes, which refers to the majority of round worms.

Tardigrades, more commonly known as "Water Bear" are the most resistant organisms on earth as they are resistant to high temperatures, pressures, and radiation. They are microscopic organisms.

Anthropods are by far the most common phylum, they are invertebrate animals with exoskeletons and articulated appendages, among them we find arachnids, crustaceans and some insects, it is said that there are more than 1 million of these species.

The onychophores are the tiniest type of phyla and the fewest, there are only records of about 180 of these species. They are also one of the oldest recorded phyla (for more than 515 million years).

Mollusks are soft-bodied animals and invertebrates. Some of these species have a protective shell that they use as a "home" like snails. There are about 100 of these species alive and 35 extinct.

The last two remaining phyla are more strange in terrestrial life, which are the chordates, which are an elongated species and are mostly aquatic beings but thanks to their great adaptability they have been able to live on land. To finish we have the rotifers, they are microscopic beings that inhabit the humid earth, in fungi, moss, etc. There are about 2200 of these species.

Terrestrial animal biomes

Biomes are regions of the world with similar climates, animals, and plants. There are terrestrial and aquatic biomes, both freshwater and marine. We have to answer a key question:

How many biomes are there?

There really isn't a completely correct answer to this question. Some people say that there are only 5 main types of biomes: aquatic, desert, forest, grassland, and tundra. Others further divide the biomes. The forests are divided into tropical forest, temperate forest, chaparral and taiga; grasslands are divided into savannas and temperate grasslands; and the aquatic biome is divided into fresh and marine water.

Deserts

The species that live in this type of biome require great adaptability, since conditions in deserts are very adverse. The animals that inhabit the desert can subsist thanks to other animals or to plants that store water, necessary for any animal.

More information at desert animals.

Some land animals live in the desert
Some land animals live in the desert

Tundras

The tundras are extremely cold and can present a climate without rain for long periods of time and temperatures below zero for much of the year. All this hinders the development of animals in this type of biome, but there are species that have been able to survive and adapt.

More information at the animals of the tundra.

Tundra habitat of the most iconic animals on the planet
Tundra habitat of the most iconic animals on the planet

Tropical forests

Very humid biomes, with constant rains, it is a totally different biome compared to the previous ones. They are usually found in tropical areas and on average they have a temperature of about 25ºC, which helps a lot to the adaptability in this type of biomes, it is not difficult to believe that it is one of the habitats where there are more kinds of animals.

More information on Forest animals.

The forests are home to the greatest diversity of species
The forests are home to the greatest diversity of species

Taiga

It is the most abundant biome on earth, with thick and green areas full of conical trees. The temperature is varied, depending on the time of year, so many spices migrate when the cold arrives and others hibernate or seek refuge.

More information at the animals of the taiga.

Taiga
Taiga

Sheets

In general, they are dry areas with large grasslands and open forests, due to its great thermal variation and its clay soil, the vegetation is not very lush. It is often described as a mix between desert and jungle. Many species live in this type of biome.

More information at the animals of the savannas.

Savanna landscape
Savanna landscape

Prairies or steppes

What you know as the prairie biome goes by different names around the world. In South America, the grasslands are called pampas. In Central Eurasia they are known as steppes, and in Africa as savannas. Essentially, they are all the same: a large ecological area dominated by grass. Grasslands do not have enough regular rainfall to cultivate a forest, but they do have too much rainfall to be classified as desert.

Most of the grassland biomes are found between deserts and forests. Flat and open, grasslands cover about a quarter of the land. They can be found in the driest parts of all continents except Antarctica.

More information at prairie animals.

Prairies
Prairies

Jungles

It is the habitat with the highest density of vegetation, they are very leafy areas and it rains a lot that together with the large amount of oxygen, heat and humidity make it a suitable place to live and develop without difficulty. They are the habitat with the largest number of species.

More information at jungle animals.

Biome of a jungle
Biome of a jungle

Mountains

Mountains are landforms that rise prominently above the surrounding landscape. They are topographic features that are defined by high relief, and their more general characteristics are that they cover a certain elevation range, have steep slopes, and converge towards small areas of peaks.

Depending on the definition, up to a quarter of the world's land area can be considered mountainous. Ecosystem services in mountains directly support about a quarter of the world's population living in or near mountains, and many more humans depend on mountains, particularly as a source of water and minerals, and as a tourist destination.

Mountains are characterized by high species and habitat diversity resulting from high environmental heterogeneity due to elevation gradients, exposure, orographic effects, and natural disturbances such as landslides, avalanches, and floods. The insular isolation of many mountains contributes to the formation of unique and diverse mountain biota. At the same time, mountains are primarily found as part of elongated chains or ridges that connect biota across large geographic distances (for example, the Cordilleras of North and South America). Mountain ecosystems are increasingly exposed to human pressures, including changes in land use (e.g. agriculture, livestock, tourism, urbanization or neglect), pollution, and climate change (e.g. For example, glacier loss, permafrost melting, desertification, increased frequency of natural hazards such as floods, landslides and avalanches, and the spread of invasive species and diseases).

More information at mountain animals.

Mountains
Mountains

We stopped

The heat dominates the moors. Aside from its spectacular beauty, it provides a valuable habitat for rare species, including birds such as merlin and golden plover, and plants such as drambberry and blueberry.

Several of the less common plants found in the wastelands are relics from the last Ice Age. As the climate warmed, the lowlands of Great Britain became unsuitable for some species and their numbers declined. Juniper, dwarf horn, rosemary, and camemo can be found in the highlands, but they are all rare here and are particularly vulnerable to threats caused by climate change.

Regarding the fauna, many species of birds nest, reproduce and feed in the moors, from the black grouse and the long owl even the lark and the snipe. They feed on the insects, moths, and butterflies that make the wastelands their home, while mice, lizards, and other small mammals are preyed upon by the viper.

More information at moorland animals.

We stopped
We stopped